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JOAQUIN ANDUJAR – stats by umpire

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October 15, 2007 marks the 25th anniversary of Joaquin Andujar becoming the first pitcher from the Dominican Republic to win a World Series game.  He was a helluva pitcher, and a memorable character, and you can read about all that and more in my forthcoming Andujar biography.

Teammates, managers, coaches, executives, writers, broadcasters -and even a few fans- were all on my interview list in the 3 1/2 years I spent researching and writing the book.  One particular demographic -umpires- became particularly interesting to me, and they are the subject of today’s post. (By all means check out Lee Gutkind’s 1975 book The Best Seat In Baseball, But You Have To Stand.  He spent the 1974 season with a National League umpiring crew.)

While I’m particularly grateful to the men in blue that shared blunt, sometimes amusing, anecdotes of being on the field with Andujar; cold, hard numbers make up the bulk of this post.  More than six-dozen umps called balls and strikes for Andujar during his 13-year major league career, and I was amazed at his statistical differences depending who was working behind the plate.  Check out the results for the umps who called at least three full games (27 innings) of his work:

Umpire:  Andujar’s won-lost, ERA, (innings), K:BB ratio

Fred Brocklander:  5-2, 2.72, (59.2), 0.88

Nick Colosi:  2-3, 3.99, (47.1), 0.95

Jerry Crawford:  3-1, 3.41, (89.2), 1.62

Bob Davidson:  2-2, 3.21, (33.2), 2.56

Satch Davidson:  3-3, 3.88, (48.2), 0.91

Gerry Davis:  0-3, 5.91, (42.2), 1.12

Dana DeMuth:  1-2, 3.10, (29), 1.13

Bob Engel:  2-2, 3.75, (48), 2.29

Bruce Froemming:  4-5, 4.52, (75.2), 1.13

Eric Gregg:  4-1, 2.40, (45), 2.00

Lanny Harris:  1-1, 5.03, (34), 1.14

Doug Harvey:  4-6, 3.47, (88), 1.62

John Kibler:  7-9, 2.25, (104), 2.00

Randy Marsh:  4-1, 2.93, (58.1), 2.06

John McSherry:  4-4, 3.43, (65.2), 1.82

Ed Montague:  3-3, 2.63, (51.1), 1.87

Andy Olsen:  2-1, 3.81, (28.1), 0.60

Dave Pallone:  2-1, 3.59, (42.2), 1.80

Paul Pryor:  1-3, 5.00, (27), 1.67

Frank Pulli:  4-3, 5.18, (48.2), 1.46

Jim Quick:  3-2, 3.88, (51), 1.39

Dutch Rennert:  4-2, 2.19, (70), 1.04

Paul Runge:  4-5, 2.92, (95.2), 1.73

Dick Stello:  4-0, 1.15, (39), 2.44

Terry Tata:  5-5, 3.24, (105.2), 1.35

Ed Vargo:  1-2, 2.76, (29.1), 1.50

Harry Wendelstedt:  3-3, 4.73, (51.1), 2.20

Joe West:  7-7, 2.78, (100.1), 1.17

Lee Weyer:  3-5, 5.06, (64), 1.47

Billy Williams:  5-3, 3.88, (72), 1.82

Charlie Williams:  5-2, 3.19, (48), 1.25

I understand the dangers of small sample size and, of course, there are many other factors besides the umpire at play.  These numbers seem interesting enough  to me to stand on their own without trying to force tenuous conclusions on them.  Enjoy!

Andujar was toughest to hit with Tata working the plate, allowing only 6.8 hits per 9 innings.  The 10.8 he allowed with Davis were his worst figure.

Kibler was the best ump for Andujar’s control, calling ball four only 2.0 times per nine innings, while Satch Davidson called more than twice as many (4.1).

Andujar struck out the most batters per nine innings (6.0) with Runge and Engel making the calls, but only 2.8 when Charlie Williams was working.

Using a full range of categories (not all listed here), I used a point system to rank Andujar’s results with each umpire above.  Based on those results, his dream crew would include:  Marsh, Kibler, Gregg & Montague.  The four that Andujar really wouldn’t want to see wearing the mask behind the dish are:  Davis, Colosi, Froemming & Satch Davidson.

Thanks for reading!

by MALCOLM ALLEN

onetoughdominican47@hotmail.com

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One Response to “JOAQUIN ANDUJAR – stats by umpire”

  1. Thanks for these very interesting splits. It appears the umpire can have a big influence on a pitcher, if he doesn’t like him. Froemming, for one, was suspended for saying racist things. It is not surprising that Joaquin did not have as good results with Froemming behind the plate.


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